If Anything Happens I Love You

By: Emily Bracher

On November 20th, Netflix released the heart wrenching short-film, If Anything Happens I Love You. Directed by Michael Govier and William McCormack, the 12 minute animated story follows two grieving parents after they cope with the loss of their young daughter, who was killed in a school shooting. 

From the beginning of the film, the audience can see the separation built in between the couple due to their loss. This idea is expanded by the introduction of what seems the physical form of their emotions/consciousness watching each other struggle. A change is tone begins when the somber melody from the background changes to 1950 by King Princess.

picture provided by: Netflix

From here, it brings in the same, shadow looking figure, who turns out to be the late daughter, watching her saddened parents sit in her old room. It then quickly changes to a different tune in the background as scenes of their life as a family pass by, showing her grow up from birth all the way to when she is around the age of ten. This moment quickly ends with the shattering noise of gunshots as what is meant to be depicted as the school shooting. Her final words to her parents are displayed through a text message saying, “If anything happens I love you.”

This film ultimately brought up the uncomfortable topic of the outcome and tragedy of school shootings and similar attacks. From such a young age, many students live with the fear of such possible events at a place where they should feel safe and focused on their education. Through perfectly crafted animation, If Anything Happens I Love You not only portrays a story but dives deeper into the bigger picture. 

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